Conditional cash transfer and child labour: the case of the Livelihood Empowerment Against Poverty (LEAP) Programme in Ghanaonal cash transfer and child labour: the case of the Livelihood Empowerment Against Poverty (LEAP) Programme in Ghana

Author(s) : Ayifah, Rebecca
Abstract : Normal 0 14 false false false IT JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabella normale"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;} Conditional cash transfer schemes are becoming an important policy tool for poverty reduction and human capital development in most developing countries. We examine the impacts of a conditional cash transfer scheme -Livelihood Empowerment Against Poverty (LEAP) on child labour in Ghana. Using a longitudinal dataset on the LEAP programme, we employ propensity score matching (PSM) combined with difference-in-difference estimation strategy and find that the scheme had no effect on child labour participation but it led to a reduction in the hours of work. The largest effect of the scheme occurs in female headed household with 0.8 hour reduction in the hours of work per day. The LEAP had no effect on relatively rich households. Other factors such as age of the child, household size and per capita expenditure of households also affect child labour supply.
Year : 2015
Country : Ghana
Publisher : - -
City Of Publication : - -
Source : UCW supported studies


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