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NEWSLETTER

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Pathways to work in the developing world: An analysis of young persons’ transition from school to the workplace
Author(s) : Dachille, Giuseppe; Manacorda, Marco; Ranzani, Marco; Rosati, Furio C
Abstract : Moving from education into the world of work is a crucial phase in youth lives. There is ample evidence that initial difficulties in this process might have long lasting consequences. The scarcity of information about middle and low income countries has especially hampered research in this area. This paper contributes to fill this gap by analysing the School to Work Transition Surveys carried out by the ILO in 28 low and middle income countries in 2012 and 2013. We use hazard models to estimate the duration, the determinants and the characteristics of the transition to the first job and to a stable job. We make use of the so-called split population model that allows to endogenously identify the share of the population expected to never transit to employment (or to stable employment) and to estimate the duration of the transition for the part of the population expected to eventually transit to employment (stable employment). The results indicate that in many countries a substantial share of youth, especially female, is expected to never transit to a job and remain unemployed or out of the labour force. The number of youth that can be expected to eventually obtain a stable job is, not surprisingly substantially lower. The duration of transition (for those expected to transit) to a first job highlights a dichotomous situation: a large group of youth is able to obtain a job within three months since leaving school, while the group that does not succeed in securing a job quickly faces long waiting times. The analysis has also evidenced the persisting gender gap in the transition to work. Female, independently of their level of education and other household circumstances, are less likely to ever transit to a job and, if they do transit, face longer transition times than males. However, this disadvantage does not fully carry over to the probability of finding a stable job. The disadvantage of early school leavers appears to be substantial not only with respect to finding a stable job (as might been expected), but also in terms of finding any job.
Year : 2015
Country :
Armenia
Jamaica
Malawi
Nepal
Colombia
Jordan
Tanzania
El Salvador
Tunisia
Cambodia
Samoa
Togo
Egypt
Bangladesh
Moldova, Republic of
Ukraine
Zambia
Peru
Uganda
Benin
Viet Nam
Brazil
Macedonia
Kyrgyzstan
Palestine
Russian Federation
Madagascar
Liberia
Publisher :
City Of Publication :
Source : UCW Working Papers
Download :
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